Facebook just got some bad news.

The Texas Supreme Court ruled against Facebook in a teen sex trafficking case.

The plaintiffs in the case argued that Facebook did not attempt to stop sex trafficking on its platform.

Facebook argued that Section 230 protected them.

Straight to jail

BREAKING: Texas Supreme Court rules Facebook failed to protect against underage sex trafficking https://t.co/WrT2YsOyhp

— Poso (@JackPosobiec) June 26, 2021

Business Insider reported:

The Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday that Facebook can be held liable for sex traffickers that use its platform to recruit and prey on child victims.

As the Houston Chronicle reported, the ruling followed three local lawsuits involving teenage victims who had met their traffickers through Facebook’s messaging tools. The plaintiffs said Facebook was negligent and did not attempt to key sex trafficking off its technology.

Facebook has argued that it is shielded by the protections of Section 230 — part of an internet law that states online platforms are not liable for what people post on their services — and should therefore not be held responsible for what is posted on its platform.

But the Texas Supreme Court said Section 230 doesn’t mean Facebook can operate as a “lawless no-man’s-land,” as the Chronicle reported.

Senior Editor for Human Events Jack Posobiec called the ruling a “landmark ruling”.

He pointed out why:

Landmark ruling

Three victims of child sex trafficking sued Facebook in Texas for allowing reciters to operate on their platform

FB argued 230 gave them immunity

TX Supreme Court ruled 230 does not https://t.co/WrT2YsOyhp

— Poso (@JackPosobiec) June 26, 2021

According to the Human Trafficking Institute’s 2020 Federal Human Trafficking Report, 65% of online sex trafficking took place on Facebook.

CBS News reported:

Data from the last two decades included in the human trafficking report showed that 30% of all victims identified in federal sex trafficking cases since 2000 were recruited online.

In 2020 in the U.S., 59% of online recruitment of identified victims in active cases took place on Facebook alone. The report also states that 65% of identified child sex trafficking victims recruited on social media were recruited through Facebook.

Twitter has also faced action over how they handle sex crimes on their platform.

Twitter has been sued by two survivors of child sexual abuse who say that Twitter did not take down images of them that were being used as blackmail.

The Gateway Pundit previously reported: 

The lawsuit alleged that Twitter refused to take down photos of him at the age of 13 that were being used to blackmail him by a predator.

The victim alleges that Twitter reviewed the photos and claimed that it did not violate their terms of service.

The images were not taken down until law enforcement got involved.

A second survivor is now joining the lawsuit.

Why doesn’t Big Tech shift resources used to censor conservatives to stopping sex trafficking?

The post Facebook Can Be Held Liable For Not Protecting Against Underage Sex Trafficking, Court Rules appeared first on The Gateway Pundit.


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